Investigative Data Journalism Conference

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Eliminating child labor and technology

Dr. Tamaro Green

Eliminating child labor and technology

2020-11-21

Simas, Golsteijn, Huijbregts, Wood, and Hertwich (2014) define child labor as work performed by children under the designated minimum working age and estimate over 215 million children to be victims of child labor worldwide in 2008. Sonntag and Spiller (2018) develop a moral concerns scale for measuring and assessing production influences such as child labor. Awan, Kraslawski, and Huiskonen (2018) describe social dimensions such as exclusion from child labor practices key to sustainable growth for sustainable international businesses. Moon, Sagisaka, Tahara, and Tsukahara (2017) explain measurement and assessment of environmental and socioeconomic impacts of stakeholders including child labor in the production of nanofibers. Francisco and Swanson (2018) suggest that blockchain technologies can be implemented for supply chain transparency and expose scandalous manufacturing activities such as child labor and forced labor.


Awan, U., Kraslawski, A., & Huiskonen, J. (2018). Governing interfirm relationships for social sustainability: The relationship between governance mechanisms, sustainable collaboration, and cultural intelligence. Sustainability, 10(12). doi:10.3390/su10124473

Francisco, K., & Swanson, D. (2018). The supply chain has no clothes: Technology adoption of blockchain for supply chain transparency. Logistics, 2(1). doi:10.3390/logistics2010002

Moon, D., Sagisaka, M., Tahara, K., & Tsukahara, K. (2017). Progress towards sustainable production: Environmental, economic, and social assessments of the cellulose nanofiber production process. Sustainability, 9(12). doi:10.3390/su9122368

Simas, S. M., Golsteijn, L., Huijbregts, A. J. M., Wood, R., & Hertwich, G. E. (2014). The “bad labor” footprint: Quantifying the social impacts of globalization. Sustainability, 6(11). doi:10.3390/su6117514

Sonntag, I. W., & Spiller, A. (2018). Measuring public concerns? Developing a moral concerns scale regarding non-product related process and production methods. Sustainability, 10(5). doi:10.3390/su10051375



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IDJC 2020

International Data Journalism Conference

IDJC 2020

International Data Journalism Conference

IDJC 2020

International Data Journalism Conference